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Bone

Hematologic neoplasms

Solitary plasmacytoma


Reviewers: Nikhil Sangle, M.D., University of Utah and ARUP Laboratories (see Reviewers page)
Revised: 15 August 2013, last major update March 2011
Copyright: (c) 2003-2013, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

Clinical features
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● Infrequent (3-5%) variant of myeloma
● Single bone lesion with monoclonal plasma cell infiltrate
● No other lytic bone lesions
● No plasma cell infiltrates in random bone marrow biopsies
● Most commonly involves bones with active hematopoiesis vertebrae, ribs, skull, pelvis, femur
● Rarely involves lymph nodes or peripheral blood
● Causes local bony destruction, pathologic bone fractures at same sites as myeloma
● No anemia, hypercalcemia or renal failure
● Usually progresses to myeloma, but may take 10-20 years

Laboratory
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● Expansion of a single clone of immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells; increase in serum levels of single homogeneous immunoglobulin (monoclonal spike on serum electrophoresis)

Radiology images
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Pelvis xray - contributed by Dr. Mark R. Wick


Skull xray - contributed by Dr. Mark R. Wick

Case reports
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● 36 year old man with tumor containing anaplastic cytology (Arch Pathol Lab Med 2004;128:237)

Micro description
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● Monoclonal plasma cell infiltrate

Micro images
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Various images


With amyloid congo red stain - contributed by Dr. Mark R. Wick

End of Bone > Hematologic neoplasms > Solitary plasmacytoma


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