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Extrahepatic bile ducts

Non tumor

Secondary sclerosing cholangitis


Reviewer: Hanni Gulwani, M.D. (see Reviewers page)
Revised: 15 February 2013, last major update September 2012
Copyright: (c) 2003-2013, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

General
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● Much more common than primary sclerosing cholangitis

Etiology
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● Biliary obstruction (choledochal cyst, choledocholithiasis, chronic pancreatitis, extrahepatic biliary atresia, post-operative), infection (immunodeficiency states), ischemia, malignancy, other (chronic graft vs. host disease, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, sarcoidosis, systemic mastocytosis), toxins
● Associated with hepatic lobar atrophy, bacterial infection (Postgrad Med J 2007;83:773)

Case reports
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● 48 year old woman with recurrent bacterial cholangitis (BMC Gastroenterol 2002;2:14)

Micro description
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● Fibrosis, inflammation, ulceration, foreign body granulomas

Micro images
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Eosinophilic cholangiopathy presenting with secondary sclerosing cholangitis

Differential diagnosis
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Bile duct carcinoma: infiltrating glands, often marked cytologic atypia, perineural invasion; no lobular pattern of peribiliary glands, no concentric fibrosis around peribiliary glands

End of Extrahepatic bile ducts > Non tumor > Secondary sclerosing cholangitis


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