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Liver and intrahepatic bile ducts-nontumor

Biliary tract disease

Oriental cholangiohepatitis


Reviewers: Komal Arora, M.D. (see Reviewers page)
Revised: 14 May 2012, last major update May 2012
Copyright: (c) 2004-2012, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

General
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● Also called recurrent pyogenic cholangitis
● Endemic in Southeast Asia, usually young adults
Symptoms: recurrent attacks of sepsis, usually E. coli, with associated abdominal pain, fever, and jaundice

Xray
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● Dilation of extrahepatic bile ducts with relatively mild/no dilation of intrahepatic ducts, localized dilatation of the lobar or segmental bile ducts, increased periportal echogenicity, segmental hepatic atrophy, gallstones
● Localized intrahepatic segmental ductal stenosis may be present, especially in the lateral segment of the left lobe or posterior segment of the right hepatic lobe

Micro description
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● Proliferation of bile ducts and inflammatory cells along the periportal spaces and hepatic parenchyma
● Hepatic and intraductal abscesses

Micro images
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Microphotograph of resected liver specimen shows soft, pigmented stone (long arrow) in dilated medium-sized bile duct. Note also severe thickening of small bile ducts and periductal fibrosis (short arrows) obliterating lumen of bile ducts and encroaching on hepatic parenchyma. (Massonís trichrome stain, original magnification x8)

Additional references
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Adv Anat Pathol 2011;18:318, AJR Am J Roentgenol.1991;157:1

End of Liver and intrahepatic bile ducts-nontumor > Biliary tract disease > Oriental cholangiohepatitis


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