Penis & scrotum
Mesenchymal tumors
Angiomyofibroblastoma


Topic Completed: 1 May 2010

Minor changes: 12 August 2020

Copyright: 2002-2020, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

PubMed Search: Angiomyofibroblastoma scrotum

Alcides Chaux, M.D.
Antonio L. Cubilla, M.D.
Page views in 2019: 420
Page views in 2020 to date: 350
Cite this page: Chaux A, Cubilla AL. Angiomyofibroblastoma. PathologyOutlines.com website. http://www.pathologyoutlines.com/topic/penscrotumangiomyofibroblastoma.html. Accessed September 23rd, 2020.
Definition / general
Terminology
  • Also called male angiomyofibroblastoma-like tumor, cellular angiofibroma
Epidemiology
  • Median age 57 years (range 39 - 88 years)
Sites
  • Scrotum or inguinal region
Clinical features
  • Features of vulvovaginal angiomyofibroblastoma and spindle cell lipoma (Am J Surg Pathol 1998;22:6)
  • May overlap with cellular angiofibroma
  • Low tendency for recurrence
Case reports
Treatment
  • Simple excision
Gross description
  • Well circumscribed, tan to rubbery cut surface and somewhat edematous appearance
  • Mean tumor size 7 cm
Gross images

Contributed by Dr. W. Laskin
Testis

Testis



Images hosted on other servers:

Gelatinous tumor

Microscopic (histologic) description
  • Hypercellular areas of spindle, plump or oval stromal cells that alternate with hypocellular areas containing similar cells loosely dispersed in an edematous background
  • Hypercellular areas tend to be located around vascular spaces
  • Thin walled blood vessels are easily found throughout the tumor with mild perivascular hyalinization common
  • Mast cells are readily identified, sometimes in abundance
  • May have bizarre degenerative and multinucleated neoplastic cells, focal epithelioid stromal cells and clusters of mature adipocytes
  • Low mitotic rate
  • No stromal mucin (stroma is NOT myxoid but edematous to collagenous)
Microscopic (histologic) images

Contributed by Dr. J. Fetsch
Testis

Testis



Images hosted on other servers:

Various images

Spermatic cord

Inguinal tumor

Positive stains
Differential diagnosis
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