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Penis and scrotum
Infectious disorders lesions
Scabies

Reviewer: Antonio Cubilla, M.D. and Alcides Chaux, M.D. (see Reviewers page)
Revised: 3 July 2013, last major update February 2010
Copyright: (c) 2002-2013, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

General
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Sites
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Etiology
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Clinical features
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Case reports
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Treatment
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Clinical images
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Mite


Burrow


Penile lesions:

Various images


Various images


Arm / hands:

Norwegian scabies in AIDS patient

Multiple vesicles and tense bullae

Small erythematous papules


With secondary infection

With leprosy

Hand


Palm


Arm of infant


Legs / feet:

Crusted scabies

Depigmentation

Leg


Other sites:

Eyelid

Buttocks


Erythematous vesicles and papules are present on torso extremities, some with adjacent linear excoriations

Crusted scabies


Micro description
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Micro images
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Lesion on leg (fig 1 & 2: mites in the epidermis; fig 3: mite and scybala, hardened masses of feces)


Intact bulla on forearm

Neutrophils, eosinophils and fibrin


Hyperkeratosis, inflammatory response

Serial section of mite

Scabies


Crusted scabies: show multiple mites
(arrows) in hyperkeratotic stratum corneum

Routine scabies: single mite;
eosinophilic spongiosis may be present


End of Penis and scrotum > Infectious disorders lesions > Scabies


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