CD Markers
CD80-89



Topic Completed: 1 February 2002

Minor changes: 13 May 2021

Copyright: 2002-2021, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

PubMed Search: CD80[title], CD81[title], CD82[title], CD83[title], CD84, CD85, CD86[title], CD87, CD88, CD89

Nat Pernick, M.D.
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Cite this page: Pernick N. CD80-89. PathologyOutlines.com website. https://www.pathologyoutlines.com/topic/cdmarkerscd80.html. Accessed June 23rd, 2021.
CD80
  • Also called B7-1, BB1
  • T cells need 2 signals for activation; the first signal is antigen peptide presented on MHC class II through the T cell receptor
  • The second (costimulatory) signal is delivered by CD80 or CD86, expressed on surface of antigen presenting cells, which interact with either CD28 or CD152 (CTLA-4)
  • Has critical role in autoimmune, humoral and transplant responses
  • Increased expression may cause excessive antigen presentation in fulminant hepatic failure, as an early step in its pathogenesis before the onset of tissue damage (Am J Pathol 1999;154:1711)
  • Receptor for some adenovirus species (Virus Res 2006;122:144)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining - normal: activated B cells, T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells
  • Reference: OMIM: 112203 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD81
  • Also called Target of an Anti-Proliferative Antibody (TAPA1)
  • Receptor for Hepatitis C Virus E2 protein in B cells (J Virol 2006;80:8695)
  • Also required for Plasmodium falciparum infectivity (Nat Med 2003;9:93)
  • Upregulation on HIV1+ B cells may ultimately cause lymphoproliferative disorders (Clin Exp Immunol 2007;147:53)
  • On B cells, is complexed with CD21, CD19 and Leu13; facilitates complement recognition
  • Member of tetraspanin family; has close associations with major histocompatibility complex class I/II proteins
  • Appears to promote muscle cell fusion and support myotube maintenance
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining - normal: lymphocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells
  • Positive staining - tumors:
  • Negative staining: erythrocytes, platelets and neutrophils
  • Reference: OMIM: 186845 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD82
CD83
CD84
CD85
  • Previously entire Immunoglobulin-like Transcript (ILT) family was clustered as CD85; now subclassified as CD85a to CD85m
  • Also called Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (LIR) and Monocyte / Macrophage Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (MIR)
  • CD85 itself is now called CD85J
  • Family of immunoreceptors expressed on monocytes and B cells; lower levels on dendritic cells and NK cells
  • Prevents NK / T cell killing and inhibits B cells by negative signaling receptors
  • Note: some family members have activating functions (see specific family members below)
  • References: Nat Immunol 2001;2:661, J Biol Chem 2006;281:19536
CD85A
  • Also called ILT5, LIR3, LILRB3 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor subfamily, member 3), HL9
  • Involved in NK mediated cytotoxicity
  • An inhibitory receptor for MHC class I molecules
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: myeloid cells, monocytes / macrophages, B cells, T cells (some), NK cells, basophils, eosinophils, dendritic cells (weak) (Blood 2004;104:2832, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2003;100:1174)
  • Reference: OMIM: 604820 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85B
  • Also called ILT8, LILRA6 (formerly LILRB6)
  • Involved in the activation of NK mediated cytotoxicity
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: NK and T cell subsets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and B lymphocytes
CD85C
  • Also called LIR8, LILRB5
  • May act as receptor for class I MHC antigens
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: NK cells
  • Reference: OMIM: 604814 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85D
  • Also called ILT4, LIR2, MIR10, LILRB2
  • Down regulates the immune response; involved in the development of tolerance
  • Upregulated by HLA-G in antigen-presenting cells, NK cells and T cells (FASEB J 2005;19:662)
  • Interacts with human leukocyte antigen A, B and G molecules and transmits negative signals that interfere with the activation of monocytes and dendritic cells (Hum Immunol 2004;65:700)
  • Also competes with CD8A for binding to class I MHC antigens
  • IL-10 renders dendritic cells hypostimulatory by upregulating cell surface CD85D and by inhibiting soluble CD85D in vitro; similar effect on endothelial cells (Eur J Immunol 2004;34:74, Eur J Immunol 2006;37:177)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: NK cells, T cells, monocytes / macrophages, dendritic cells, eosinophils (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2003;100:1174)
  • Reference: OMIM: 604815 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85E
  • Also called ILT6, LIR4, LILRA3
  • May act as soluble receptor for class I MHC antigens
  • Homozygous deletions associated with multiple sclerosis (7% vs 4% of normals) (Genes Immun 2005;6:445)
  • 85% of Japanese lack functional CD85E alleles (Hum Genet 2006;119:436)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: B cells, NK cells, peripheral blood monocytes, lung
  • Reference: OMIM: 604818 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85F
  • Also called ILT11, LILRB7, LIR9
  • May play a role in triggering innate immune responses (Blood 2003;101:1484)
  • Membrane bound and secreted
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: neutrophils, monocytes
  • Negative staining: B cells, T cells, NK cells
  • Reference: OMIM: 606047 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85G
  • Also called ILT7, LILRA4
  • May act as receptor for class I MHC antigens
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: plasmacytoid dendritic cells (J Exp Med 2006;203:1399)
  • Negative staining: myeloid dendritic cells, other white blood cells
CD85H
CD85I
  • Also called LIR6, CD85i
  • Note: since some biologists use lower case, CD85l [CD85L] may be confused with CD85i
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: B cells, monocytes
  • Negative staining: dendritic cells, NK cells, T cells
  • References: OMIM: 604810 [Accessed 3 May 2021], J Immunol 2003;171:3056
CD85J
  • Also called CD85, LIR1, ILT2, MIR7, LILRB1
  • Transduces negative signals that prevent killing of MHC class I expressing cells
  • Binds classical (HLA-A and HLA-B) and non-classical (HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-F) MHC class I molecules
  • Upregulated by HLA-G in antigen presenting cells, NK cells and T cells (FASEB J 2005;19:662)
  • Receptor for CMV UL18 protein, which resembles MHC class I molecules (J Virol 2005;79:2251)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: B cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (low), T cells (some), NK cells (some)
  • Reference: OMIM: 604811 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD85K
CD85L
CD85M
  • Also called ILT10, LILRA5
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining: T cell subsets, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells and B lymphocytes (Washington State University)
CD86
  • Also called B7-2
  • T cells need 2 signals for activation: the first signal is antigen peptide presented on MHC class II through the T cell receptor
  • The second (costimulatory) signal is delivered by CD80 or CD86, expressed on surface of antigen presenting cells, which interact with either CD28 or CD152 (CTLA-4)
  • CD80 and CD86 appear to have opposing functions on regulatory T cells (J Immunol 2004;172:2778)
  • Polymorphisms are associated with:
  • Increased expression may cause excessive antigen presentation in fulminant hepatic failure as an early step in its pathogenesis before the onset of tissue damage (Am J Pathol 1999;154:1711)
  • High circulating soluble levels are poor prognostic factor in myeloma (Br J Haematol 2006;133:165)
  • Receptor for some adenovirus species (Virus Res 2006;122:144)
  • Associated with H. pylori dependent early stage high grade MALT lymphoma of stomach (World J Gastroenterol 2005;11:4357)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining - normal:
    • B cells, thymocytes (J Immunol 2001;167:3668)
    • Mature T cells, memory T cells (high, Tissue Antigens 2004;64:132)
    • Monocytes / macrophages, platelets, dendritic cells, granulocytes and CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (Exp Hematol 2003;31:798)
    • Interdigitating dendritic cells in T zones of secondary lymphoid organs, Langerhans cells, peripheral blood dendritic cells, memory B cells, germinal center B cells, monocytes, endothelial cells, activated T cells
  • Positive staining - disease:
  • Negative staining: immature dendritic cells
  • Reference: OMIM: 601020 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
CD87
CD88
CD89
  • Also called FCAR, FCalphaR
  • IgA Fc receptor, binds IgA and eliminates IgA coated targets
  • Induces phagocytosis, degranulation, respiratory burst and killing of microorganisms
  • Pathogenic group A and group B streptococci produce virulence factors that block the binding of IgA to CD89, inhibiting IgA-mediated immunity (J Biol Chem 2006;281:1389)
  • No significant clinical use by pathologists
  • Positive staining - normal: neutrophils, monocytes / macrophages, activated eosinophils, alveolar and splenic macrophages, interstitial dendritic cells
  • Negative staining: mesangial cells (J Am Soc Nephrol 2000;11:241)
  • Reference: OMIM: 147045 [Accessed 3 May 2021]
Diagrams / tables

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CD88: C5A and its effects

Microscopic (histologic) images

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CD82: endometrial carcinoma

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CD82: oral cavity (normal and malignant)

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CD82: breast carcinoma (D-F)

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CD83: infantile hemangioma endothelium

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CD83: decidua

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CD83+ dendritic cells in breast tumor


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CD87: endometrial adenocarcinoma

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CD87: pancreatic adenocarcinoma (figures B, D)

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CD88: normal and Alzheimer brain

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