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Liver and intrahepatic bile ducts-nontumor

Vascular disorders

Hepatoportal sclerosis


Reviewers: Komal Arora, M.D. (see Reviewers page)
Revised: 15 May 2012, last major update May 2012
Copyright: (c) 2004-2012, PathologyOutlines.com, Inc.

General
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● Also called portal venopathy, noncirrhotic portal fibrosis, idiopathic portal hypertension
● Due to extrahepatic or intrahepatic portal venous obstruction, arsenic or vinyl chloride exposure
● Causes portal hypertension without overt liver failure and variable liver function and hematologic abnormalities
● Diagnosis is usually only “suggestive of” or “consistent with” due to patchy nature of disease

Noncirrhotic portal hypertension in HIV-infected patients:
● Prior prolonged exposure to didanosine; most distinctive histological finding is obliteration of portal veins (AIDS 2010;24:1171, Curr Opin Infect Dis 2011;24:12)

Micro description
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● Patchy mural thickening, fibrotic obstruction or absence of portal veins, frequent portal vein thromboses and sclerosis
● Bridging fibrosis between portal areas without cirrhosis, hepatocyte regeneration (nodular regenerative hyperplasia), multiple channels in portal areas with portal vein-like spaces directly abutting hepatic parenchyma
● Parenchymal atrophy of the liver secondary to portal malperfusion

Additional references
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Hepatology 2011;54:1071, Semin Liver Dis 2002;22:59

End of Liver and intrahepatic bile ducts-nontumor > Vascular disorders > Hepatoportal sclerosis


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